Spending Time In Nature Is Healthy

Nowadays, Life Is Spent Primarily Indoors, and That's A Problem...

I remember growing up spending more time outdoors playing games, riding bikes and spending more time in nature with my friends. While some communities still encourage a outdoor lifestyle, it's become more common for kids to watch hours of TV, play endless hours of video games or "socialize" over Facebook. That means we are indoors most of our life, from school, to work, to home, a trip to the mall and in our cars. Stress is the #1 killer of Americans and it's because we want to always be busy for the sake of being busy, even when there's an opportunity to allow ourselves downtime.

As a result, our bodies are not able to regenerate healthy cells, causing us more respiratory ailments and overall exhaustion. While we can't completely do away with toxins in our food, water and air, we can try to eliminate them whenever possible. Going to the gym is certainly a step in the right direction but it too is indoors and lacking of that natural element we so greatly need to optimize our health.

Consider spending more time in nature. Spring is around the corner and you could do your body a TON of good breathing that fresh cool air, communing with nature, trees and wildlife reconnects you to who you truly are. Next time there's a sunny (OR overcast) weekend, grab a picnic basket, a blanket, some bicycles, get in the car and head to a state or national park. I live In Dallas, TX and while there aren't mountains and oceans nearby, I make time to drive over to a nature preserve or take a quick road trip for some peaceful time. I come back with a mind and body that is electronically detoxified and ready for new challenges. 

If you're a parent, your children will sense an opening and their energy will reflect this connection with nature. The only downside (If there is one) is you and your kids might become addicted to being outdoors. 

~ Namaste.



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